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Thread: Ceramic seal tightness

  1. Back To Top    #1

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Sarasota,FL
    Posts
    18

    Ceramic seal tightness

    I'm installing a new pump motor. Replacing a Sta-Rite Dura-Glas. I put in the ceramic seal on the pump housing that goes in front of the actual motor, but the shaft for the motor does not sit tightly through the ceramic seal. Is this normal? Or is something wrong? Should there be space between the seal and the shaft? Would water leak into it if there is space?

    I am also wondering... does the water go past the diffuser into the impeller?

    Thanks for any help!

    Jolene
    14,0000 gallon, rectangle, in-ground pool with Pebblesheen finish. 1 hp Sta-Rite Dura-Glas pump and TA60 Tagelus sand filter.

  2. Back To Top    #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    156

    Re: Ceramic seal tightness

    The shaft seal has two parts. The white ceramic seal presses into the pump body, but does not touch the motor shaft. The other half is the spring loaded carbon seal and it is installed behind impeller with the carbon face against the white ceramic seal. It slides on to and seals against the motor shaft. You don't want to touch the face of the carbon seal (either seal really) with your fingers as the oils can damage the surface.

    I think (my guess...) the diffuser plate helps seal the inlet side from the discharge side of the impeller and also helps direct the water into the center of the impeller.
    27K gal, IG vinyl, 1.5 HP pump, 24" sand filter, Goldline Aqua Plus SWG

  3. Back To Top    #3

    In the Industry

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    Jun 2013
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    2

    Re: Ceramic seal tightness

    Quote Originally Posted by gordiec
    The shaft seal has two parts. The white ceramic seal presses into the pump body, but does not touch the motor shaft. The other half is the spring loaded carbon seal and it is installed behind impeller with the carbon face against the white ceramic seal. It slides on to and seals against the motor shaft.

    You don't want to touch the face of the carbon seal (either seal really) with your fingers as the oils can damage the surface.
    Ok....I came onto the forum today to specifically search for a statement regarding this somewhat prevalent theory about the fragile nature of shaft seals and these impractical cautions against touching them with our hands. I'm currently working in a small chain of pool stores in South Florida being semi retired from 30 years in the pool service and repair industry here. One of my coworkers was scaring the bejeezus out of a poor customer who was buying a new motor and seal telling him this same thing about not touching it for fear of total annihilation of the components.

    So in defense of rational thinkers everywhere I've decided to use the magic of the internet to try and get to the root of this "old wive's tale." Can anyone supply me with any scientific basis for this theory or even anecdotal evidence to substantiate these claims??

    Because I have a ton of evidence I have accumulated over the years that demonstrates these shaft seals are made of some really tough stuff and heartily reap the benefits of a generous smothering of lubricant saturating every square millimeter of both the ceramic and carbon surfaces.
    I have performed easily over a thousand motor replacements using this method and my seals never leaked. And since I maintained a steady customer base over many years I was able to track these repairs and observe as the motors failed from old age long before the seals wore out.
    I first learned this method of smothering the entire seal assembly with lube from a man named
    Ed Rice. (Who also advised me to have no fear of human contact with various parts of the seals) Many in Broward County, Fla would recognize that name as the man who built up a very successful business known as Rice Pump and Motor. I remember as he grew from a small rented warehouse space to the point where he bought a piece of property on busy Powerline Road and constructed a brand new pump and motor shop directly across the street from Horner Pool Supplies.

    So I figure if its good enough for old Ed then its good enough for me. I also remember hanging around his shop sometimes and hearing him rant and rave about yet another person who brought up this crazy idea about not being able to touch the seals. So I'm asking all of you dear readers the same question Ed often asked out loud: Just where does this idea come from? Anyone?


    Patrick in Fla

  4. Back To Top    #4

    In the Industry

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    9

    Re: Ceramic seal tightness

    I know this thread is a couple years old. I own a pool service business and I remember when I started replacing motors hearing dont touch the seal, especially the ceramic (white) seal with your fingers. Well, being the stubborn fool that I am sometimes, I thought yeah yeah whatever. So, I proceeded to push the ceramic seal into place with my fingers. Sure as shootin, they all leaked. From then on, I pushed the ceramic seal into place using a clean plastic bag between my finger and the seal and none have leaked. Thats my 2 cents based on my experience...

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