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Thread: Proper steps would be muriatic acid 30 minutes bleach

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    Proper steps would be muriatic acid 30 minutes bleach

    So Chem Geek proper steps would be muriatic acid 30 minutes bleach? If that is the case then I just messed up because I added bleach then muriatic acid...Should I add sequestrant or should I wait until tomorrow to add sequestrant? New to taking care of 17,500 gallon pool. I have 4 ppm iron content due to well water. I filled the pool a week ago and have been battling ever since. Water is a light green and I can see the bottom, but it is obvious that there is still a tremendous amount of iron in the water because every morning the filter is a rust color. I want to be floating in a clear pool by Mother's Day!
    Lafayette, Louisiana 17,900 Intex Ultra Frame, AG, Intex 1500 gph Cartridge B

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    Join Date
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    San Rafael, CA USA
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    Re: bleach use and metal

    Just add the sequestrant. Even if there were some stains, the sequestrant might remove them if they are fresh.
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

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    Re: Proper steps would be muriatic acid 30 minutes bleach

    Actually a chelating agent would be far superior to a sequesterant. Natural Chemistry makes a product called Metal Free which is found at most pool stores for 20 bucks for a quarter bottle. You can safely dump in 2 bottles in the skimmer. It takes time and patience, as results can be a week or more before water is perfectly colorless. The clear green you see is oxidized iron, and perhaps even copper, if your home has copper pipes. Do not use any HTH metal products, as they contain things that can cause other headaches. Metal Free will not give you any grief.

    Pool: IG 22k- 16x32 clipped corners- vinyl liner, w/ a great board. Built in 3/99, new to me 2/2011.
    Equip: Hayward 3600 DE filter, Hayward CL-200 Chlorinator (empty since 7/5/2013).
    K-2006 Test kit with Speedstir
    Located in Cincinnati, OH. TFP lurker since 9/2011, BBB interested since 5/2012 and converted 7/2013.

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    Re: Proper steps would be muriatic acid 30 minutes bleach

    A very knowledgeable man at Taylor provided me with this info, btw. Chelating is always better for clear green water from metal

    Pool: IG 22k- 16x32 clipped corners- vinyl liner, w/ a great board. Built in 3/99, new to me 2/2011.
    Equip: Hayward 3600 DE filter, Hayward CL-200 Chlorinator (empty since 7/5/2013).
    K-2006 Test kit with Speedstir
    Located in Cincinnati, OH. TFP lurker since 9/2011, BBB interested since 5/2012 and converted 7/2013.

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    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    San Rafael, CA USA
    Posts
    12,082

    Re: Proper steps would be muriatic acid 30 minutes bleach

    We use the terms metal sequestrant and chelating agent interchangeably even though they are technically somewhat different (see chelating agent and this thread). The Natural Chemistry® Metal Free MSDS says it is EDTA (at least for spas or this one says citric acid). Note that their Tips & Info states "Metal Free cannot be used with a clarifier. The polymers in both products are negatively charged; they will repel one another and cause cloudy water." Actually, most polymeric clarifiers are positively charged because they are designed to attract negative cell surfaces (such as algae) so more likely is that the Metal Free polymers are negatively charged (to attract the positive metal ions) and that they would attract clarifiers to create combined substances that clouded the water and probably eventually get caught in the filter.

    If Metal Free is EDTA, then it will create a chlorine demand since it breaks down from chlorine and needs frequent replenishment (did the Taylor person tell ou that?). This is why we normally recommend HEDP-based sequestrants instead since they are more chlorine resistant so last longer. The "grief" that the Taylor person is referring to is that when HEDP slowly breaks down it releases orthophosphate so they are worried about phosphates in the water. Sounds like this "knowledgeable" person from Taylor has bought the anti-phosphate line so I would very much question their recommendation. Now if the Metal Free product is a special polymer that binds well to metal ions and doesn't break down quickly, then that would be reasonable. If one wants to physically remove the metal from the water, then using CuLator might help (still too early to tell if this product works reliably).
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

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