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Thread: Electric current in pump filter basket

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    Electric current in pump filter basket

    I tried a replacement pump that was used from a friend - had been working at her house but didn't get it working at mine.
    The problem -- hum instead of movement. I realize this is probably a capacitor which I would fix but I also have some reluctence to try as when I was investigating the lack of spinning impeller, I touched the water in the basket filter and recieved a fairly nasty shock (220)

    So.... I didn't notice until later that the ground attaching to other pool parts - the large gauage wire attached to exterior of pump via screw was not attached - would that be the only thing causing the current or would there also have to be a live contact to the metal somewhere that's causing the flow.

    I can't see any reason why there should be current in the basket - the wires are correctly attached, no breaks in the wires can be seen touching frame or another wire and there is no water leakage where there shouldn't be.
    Matt Giovanisci

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    Ohm_Boy's Avatar
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    Re: Electric current in pump filter basket

    Sure sounds like live contact. I would first suspect that it is not quite correctly wired. The unconnected ground is not causing the current flow, though it would probably result in tripping of the breaker if it were connected. This is what it is supposed to do, as a safety for exactly this condition.
    You should get it checked by a qualified electrician.
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    Re: Electric current in pump filter basket

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_bonding

    if the bonding wire was attached you might not have received a shock, regardless listen to Ohm_boy about getting someone out there who knows what they are doing there could be a problem with the supply
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    Mod Squad Bama Rambler's Avatar
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    Re: Electric current in pump filter basket

    Without exception that bonding wire should be connected. I've seen transient voltage as high as 90 volts.

    Since you say it worked at her house but just hums at yours I suspect an incorrect wiring issue. You need to check, or have checked, that the motor is wired for the correct voltage (some are dual voltage) and wired correctly phase wise. If you're not completely comfortable working with electrical equipment I also suggest that you employ a competent electrician.
    Dave J. TFP Moderator
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    Re: Electric current in pump filter basket

    further info - was about 4yr old waterway w/ 2 speed ao smith centurion switchless - Worked at her house - sat for 5 months w/o usage at my house
    my supply and pump I pulled out is wired for 220 and her motor is wired for 220. Wires are fine now - 1st tried original wiring - which is when it hummed, and after a short while of humming - it would trip the breaker. This is when I tried to confirm movement of water and received a shock. I've been hit by 110 regular outlet wiring many times - don't usually realize it's hitting me for a while and it's just a small throbbing annoyance - this was much more substantial.
    When I pulled her pump back out I noticed the communal ground tie had slipped off but I'm not sure if this was before the current or happened when I moved it to access the screw to remove...... Couldn't figure out any reason for the current unless that could have some bearing.

    SO.... I replaced the wiring with new wire, instead of screwing in the wires at motor contact, I bought the Y connectors to slip on the fins, reconnected everything and still humming - I did NOT try to see if there was still voltage at the basket as I didn't want another thump... and while I am good with wiring and whatnot, I am not sure the appropriate way to test for voltage in the basket
    - I've an ohm meter --- haven't figured out if I could just suspend the contacts into the water and flip on to see if it has a reading or if that would cause some other problem - break meter or other.

    I figured the capacitor must be at fault for the hum but I'm still at a loss as to the current and have thus not worked on capacitor test/replacement and looked more toward getting a new pump.
    Matt Giovanisci

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    dmanb2b's Avatar
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    Re: Electric current in pump filter basket

    IMHO...this is one of those situations that call for an onsite expert ASAP, regardless of the cost. If the water in the pump basket is really at 220, then so is the pool Perhaps you can think of a friend of a friend who is an electrician and can stop by for some advice? Until the you'd be best served to cut-off the power to the circuit(s) feeding the pool.
    24'x52" AGP (13,500 Gallons), Intex SWG, (2)Solar Bear 4x20 panels, Hayward S220T Filter, 1/2hp Pentair Superflo

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    Ohm_Boy's Avatar
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    Re: Electric current in pump filter basket

    You are obviously adept at wiring, as you say, and while you do have a meter, you also say that you are unsure of the testing methods to troubleshoot. You are prudent to recognize your limitations. I've known plenty of folks who could not make that self-assessment.
    In this case, I vehemently agree with dmanb2b. When things do not do as expected, ESPECIALLY when dangerous voltage is exposed, someone with good electrical knowledge and experience should be involved.
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