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Thread: Monitoring CCs

  1. Back To Top    #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Pt. Arthur, TX
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    174

    Monitoring CCs

    I've never owned/cared for a pool. Just trying to get a little more understanding.

    I understand the math involved in the FC/CYA ratio chart.

    But has anyone ever experimented with reducing the FC at a constant CYA to find the break over point of when CCs will start to form?

    For instance, according to the chart, if I were to maintain a CYA of 30, my minimum FC would be 2. Does that mean I'll start to see CCs at two, or does that mean CCs shouldn't be present, if everything else is balanced?

    Is my pool safe, as long as the CCs don't go over .5? Should I not allow anyone to swim in a pool with the CCs over .5?

    Last question (for now), does the smell start at .5, or is it much higher? Basically, if I can smell chlorine, should I be swimming in that pool?
    Custom Cloud shaped 19'x35' - Raised Spa 6' diameter
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  2. Back To Top    #2
    JasonLion's Avatar
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    May 2007
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    Silver Spring, MD
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    37,879

    Re: Monitoring CCs

    You are making an incorrect assumption somewhere. CC is not a reliable indicator of problems. Of to put that more plainly, when you have CC you have a problem, but you can have a problem and not have any CC. Likewise, a bad smell is an indicator of a problem, but a lack of smell doesn't prove that the pool is safe. Nor does the small correspond very well to the CC level. You can have a bad smell and have lots of CC, or none.

    So,
    Quote Originally Posted by thunderkyss
    experimented with reducing the FC at a constant CYA to find the break over point of when CCs will start to form
    doesn't make any sense, because there will be problems eventually as you lower the FC level, but there is no reason to believe that those problems will bring an elevated CC level.

    Swimming is fine as long as the FC level is between the minimum and shock level for your CYA level, CC is 0.5 or lower, the water is clear, PH is between 7.2 and 7.8, and there is no obvious organic contamination.
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  3. Back To Top    #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Pt. Arthur, TX
    Posts
    174

    Re: Monitoring CCs

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonLion
    You are making an incorrect assumption somewhere.
    I don't doubt that at all.
    Quote Originally Posted by JasonLion
    CC is not a reliable indicator of problems. Of to put that more plainly, when you have CC you have a problem, but you can have a problem and not have any CC. Likewise, a bad smell is an indicator of a problem, but a lack of smell doesn't prove that the pool is safe. Nor does the small correspond very well to the CC level. You can have a bad smell and have lots of CC, or none.

    So,
    Quote Originally Posted by thunderkyss
    experimented with reducing the FC at a constant CYA to find the break over point of when CCs will start to form
    doesn't make any sense, because there will be problems eventually as you lower the FC level, but there is no reason to believe that those problems will bring an elevated CC level.

    Swimming is fine as long as the FC level is between the minimum and shock level for your CYA level, CC is 0.5 or lower, the water is clear, PH is between 7.2 and 7.8, and there is no obvious organic contamination.
    Thanks.
    Custom Cloud shaped 19'x35' - Raised Spa 6' diameter
    Rainbow 320 Inline Chlorinator - Paramount Clear O3 Ozone Generator
    Hayward C4025 Cartridge Filter (Hayward CX880XRE) - Hayward Tristar 2 speed pump
    Hayward H400Fdn Heater, Hayward GVA-24 (valve actuators)

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