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Thread: Leak Detection - Raypak 2100

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    Leak Detection - Raypak 2100

    Is there a recommended way to test for leaks in a Raypak 2100 heater? I have had several over the years (leaky drain plug on return side, loose connection on the pressure switch) but this time it is not so obvious. I suspect that it might be a leaky heat exchanger (ouch!) but maybe not.

    What is the best way to find the **** thing? From the front panel, you can see very little, and the easily accessible side (the left) has an insulation blanket which is not real helpful either. Any of you pros have a clever way to spot the leaker and, if not, can you suggest a good vocabulary of swear words?

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    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South Central NJ
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    3,192

    Re: Leak Detection - Raypak 2100

    Where are you seeing water?

    Scott
    PoolGuyNJ
    Owner of - PoolGuyNJ LLC
    Expert Pool and Spa Repairs, Renovations, and Augmentation. Helping people decide what is the right gear for meeting their needs. Expectations Set, Expectations Met, No Surprises.

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    Re: Leak Detection - Raypak 2100

    Yes, water on the floor around the heater (this is an indoor installation). Part of the problem is that the floor was not sloped properly when the concrete was poured so practically any leak in the pool room puddles around the heater (pump seals, filter o-rings, etc.).

    However, this one is definitely a heater leak. As I mentioned, I have fixed leaks from a faulty drain plug on the return header and loose pressure sensor on the in/out header. The way it looks on the floor is always the same so that is not very useful in troubleshooting. I suspect it might be a leaky heat exchanger, but obviously I cannot see that when the system is running because with the front door off the burner tray block the view. It is possible to get direct visualization of the underside of the heat exchanger with the unit running and, if so, how?

    Beside the headers the parts diagram makes it look like the only potential leaks can come from the header gaskets, the pipe o-rings, or the tube bundle. How often do the tube bundles get leaky? I have read the warning in the manual about acidic water chemistry, but ours tends to go basic due to our well water and my wife is very good about keeping the pH between 7.6 and 7.8.

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    Join Date
    May 2007
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    South Central NJ
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    Re: Leak Detection - Raypak 2100

    I would suggest using a shop vac to blow/suck the water away from the heater, remove the front panel, blow or suck the water out from under there too, shine a flash light in and see where the water drip down from when the pump is on. You will not be able to see the bottom of the heat exchanger tubes without a mirror and removal of the burner assembly.

    Likely spots for the leak would be the headers (smaller side panels), sensor well, or the pressure switch's connecting tube's connection to the header.

    It worth removing the small side panels by the plumbing and on the opposite side.

    IMHO, 7.6 to 7.8 is still a bit too high. I like to keep the pools in my care, that have a heater, closer to 7.4. Those without, I'll go a bit lower to 7.2 as that is chlorine's most effective point.

    Scott
    Owner of - PoolGuyNJ LLC
    Expert Pool and Spa Repairs, Renovations, and Augmentation. Helping people decide what is the right gear for meeting their needs. Expectations Set, Expectations Met, No Surprises.

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    Re: Leak Detection - Raypak 2100

    Yeah, the first thing I did was to remove the small side panels and feel around as best I could for moisture. When you have a leak near the side doors, the water tends to soak the insulation blankets and that is a good hint!

    I was trying to avoid taking the burner tray out, but it looks like that is my next step. The pool room itself is nicely heated, but the mechanical room is not and it gets cold in there (I live in Michigan). Oh well . . .

    Thanks for the advice. Have a good Christmas.

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    Re: Leak Detection - Raypak 2100

    Well you mirror trick works pretty well. I looks like I have a minor leak in the tube bundle.

    Since we are planning on moving in a few months, is there a way to plug the leak other than replacing the heat exchanger? Looking around the web, the part seems to be about $650 and I am disinclined to pop for that.

    Any experience with Marlig Fix-A-Leak? I know it is not the ideal solution, replacing the whole heat exchanger assembly would be my call if I was staying put, but the budget simply does not allow that kind of expense at the moment. Is this worth a try or is it a waste of $30?

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    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South Central NJ
    Posts
    3,192

    Re: Leak Detection - Raypak 2100

    Wasted $30. The heat exchanger gets too hot.

    If you are under contract and it says heated pool, you may not have much choice. Ask your attorney for guidance.

    There are gaskets to be replaced too when changing out the heat exchanger.

    All in all, **** PIA. Most pool services suggest swapping the heater if it's more than five or six years old.

    Scott
    Owner of - PoolGuyNJ LLC
    Expert Pool and Spa Repairs, Renovations, and Augmentation. Helping people decide what is the right gear for meeting their needs. Expectations Set, Expectations Met, No Surprises.

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