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Thread: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Rockcrawler's Avatar
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    How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    I would consider myself pretty handy, but I have yet to find instructions on how to replace the motor bearings on my motor. I could probaly figure out how to do it, but because I am older now, and have learned many lessons from taking stuff apart I would really like some instructions on how to do this, such as tools needed and a somewhat basic by the numbers precedure, thanks in advance.

    Rob

    I have a A.O. Smith (Century/Centurion) 2h.p. Y56Y frame I believe I have found the right bearings, could someone please verify? This was the only place I found these bearings.

    http://www.poolcenter.com/motor_parts.htm
    Bearing #203 for the rear and Bearing #304 for the shaft end
    13,000 IG Plaster, 2hp whisperflo pump, 48 sq in pentair DE Filter, 1 skimmer, 2 eyeball outlets, 200 sq ft solar panels on second story, Auto Pilot SWG-36, Polaris ATV Cleaner

  2. #2
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    May want to give these guys a call. They may be able to help with parts or rebuild/exchange your motor.

    http://www.perryspoolpump.com/
    16K gallon, Pebble tec, beach entry. Two 1 hp Pentair Whisperflos. One for Paramount MDX2 main drain, Paramount debris canister, and Pentair CCP 520 filter. One for skimmer w/sock and Paramount PCC2000 in floor cleaner. 3/4 hp Pentair Pinnacle for waterfall. Fiberstars fiber optic pool lighting. Aqua-Logic AQL-P-4 control panel with wired remote in the house. SWCG system that is not used. Ultra-Pure Ozonator that is not used.

  3. #3
    Senior Member spishex's Avatar
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    I can't verify the bearings, but I do have an AO Smith bearing replacement instruction manual! (sorry if the spelling gets bad, I'm just going to put my head down and type it as quickly as possible...)

    Replacing a bearing in a motor is not a difficult task, provided you follow these set procedures. If a bearing is noisy or doesn't run smoothly it should be replaced. If a bearing is removed for any reason, it should be replaced with a new one. If it's necessary to replace one bearing, replace the other as well to prevent return service calls and pump down time.

    Use only AOS bearings obtained from AOS and ordered by the proper AOS part number. Bearings obtained from AOS are built with balls having a specific fit, checked for sound level and filled with high grade grease for the temperature and service conditions. AOS bearings are lubricated and require no further attention during their life. Do not substitute. Do not reuse old bearings pulled from shafts because this could damage the motor and cause a return service call. After the power has been sut off and the motor disassembled from the pump follow these steps:

    1. Mark the end frames and shell of the motor with two pieces of tape or a marker so the motor can be reassembled in the original configuration.
    2. Remove the rotor and shaft from the shell by:
    - For two Compartment design, remove the canopy. Remove the switch to get access to the governor on the end of the shaft. Remove governor springs. Remove governor weight by spreading the bracket with a screwdriver. Take out screw on end of the shaft and remove governor bracket.
    3. Remove the four thru-bolts.
    4. Remove th end frame opposite the shaft by putting a screwdriver in the notch and tapping the handle of the screwdriver.
    5. Remove the shaft end frame using the same method. Carefully pull the rotor and shaft assembly out of the shell from shaft extension end. Be careful not to lose the washer and bearing load spring that is positioned in the bearing bore in the end frame opposite the shaft extension. Be sure to replace the washer and spring during re-assembly.
    6. Remove the bearing locking screws from the shaft end frame.
    - Note: New motors do not have a lock plate. They have a lock clip that is attached to the end frame with a single screw. The screw is located in one of the two holes that used to be used for the lock plate screw. Turn the screw 1/2 turn to release the bearing from the end frame.
    7. Remove the shaft collars or snap rings used to secure the bearings. (you will need a pair of external ring pliers.
    8. Use a bearing puller to remove defective bearings.
    9. Install new bearings using a tube that presses only on the inner race of the bearing. Do not put pressure on the outer race of the bearing or the bearing will be damaged.

    Re-assemble in revers order of the disassembly instructions. If the motor is a two compartment design make sure you adjust the start switch correctly (let me know if you need this part, it's a different section). Make sure there are no leads in the area of the rotating governor. When the canopy is installed make sure no leads are pinched between the canopy and end bracket.

    Recheck wiring. Check rotor and shaft to make sure it turns freely by hand. Check motor for grounds before applying power.
    The tubes for setting the new bearings should be:
    203: 7/8" OD, .095 wall thickness
    304: 1" OD, .095 wall thickness

    Let me know if you need clarification on what some of those parts are.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Rockcrawler's Avatar
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    Thanks for the link Ntrsand man and Thanks for your time Spishex for typing the instructions, I really apreciate it. and the measurement for the press tubes are a plus, I'll print this out, this is exactly what I needed, not sure I would of figured this one out. Thanks again.
    13,000 IG Plaster, 2hp whisperflo pump, 48 sq in pentair DE Filter, 1 skimmer, 2 eyeball outlets, 200 sq ft solar panels on second story, Auto Pilot SWG-36, Polaris ATV Cleaner

  5. #5
    Senior Member Rockcrawler's Avatar
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    Replaced both bearings in my motor today, was kinda skeptical about doing it, after tearing it apart and taking the old bearings off, the old bearings did not seem to be bad, no wobble or anything like that, but I replaced them anyways, got it back together, powered it up and WOW what a quiet motor now, the motor is 4.5 yrs old, I run it 10hrs in the summer per day and 3 hrs a day during winter, so $20 bucks every 4.5 yrs for new bearings is not bad.

    Thanks again Spishex for the directions.

    I was very skeptical about the bearings being bad, because it did not have a noise that was sqealing. If you are even somewhat mechanical you can do this your self and save you at least a $100!!!!!


    Rob
    13,000 IG Plaster, 2hp whisperflo pump, 48 sq in pentair DE Filter, 1 skimmer, 2 eyeball outlets, 200 sq ft solar panels on second story, Auto Pilot SWG-36, Polaris ATV Cleaner

  6. #6
    Senior Member spishex's Avatar
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    Well done!

  7. #7
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    Hey Rockcrawler, Im pretty sure I have the exact same pump as you as well as the same problem. It started out that when I first turn the pump on it would squeal for about 20 seconds and then whrrr away as usual. Just last night I woke up and it was squealing. Are these the same symptoms you noticed when your bearings were going bad?

    Also, any tips on any problems you had with the instructions above? Thanks.
    15000 IG Gunite Plaster
    Hayward DE4820
    1.5 HP Century Centurion
    PB4 3/4 HP Booster Pump
    Polaris 280

  8. #8
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    Rockcrawler -

    Realize this is a couple years old now, but did your motor sound anything like this?

    [youtube:34yce8rl]lWOLD4tPNzo[/youtube:34yce8rl]

    Trying to figure out if this is a bearing problem.... it has the same motor yours does.

    Thanks!

  9. #9
    Mod Squad Smykowski's Avatar
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    Jimbrowski,

    I have a 1.5hp hayward pump that had a squeal developing two summers ago. Same deal, squeal at startup, but it would even out after it warmed up. Last summer, squeal got worse. I pulled it apart, and the bearing seals were broken, grease everywhere. Replaced the seals, and when I bench tested it (pool already closed for winter), it had that nice new hum. The disclaimer is that I haven't run it "for real" yet, but it sure sounded fixed.

    As for the Whisperflo in the video, I have no expertise. However, I have heard that if your wheel bearings go in a car, it sounds like a roar that varies with wheel speed. Take that for what it's worth.

    Grainger sells double sealed motor bearings. Just get the number that's stamped onto the seal of the old bearing, and match it to the "industry" number on the website.
    TFP Moderator33' round, 23,000 gal AG vinyl , 1.5HP PowerFlo Matrix downsized with 3/4HP impeller (X2), Hayward S180T 150# sand filter (X2), Hayward H250 NG heater
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  10. #10
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    Just to close the loop on this thread, I tried replacing the bearings on my 2HP AOS motor. Ended up bending the shaft on the threaded end. The bearing wouldn't come out of the motor housing, and I used a hammer to dislodge it.... BAD MOVE!!! Anyway, this is a great forum, and I appreciate the info I've gotten here. To compare the sound of a bad motor to that of a smooth-running motor, I've uploaded a short clip of the same pump with the new motor. It's really a lot quieter in person than on the camera - I guess the camera has an automatic setting to increase gain until its sound meter is in the same range. You can really tell the difference from the absence of pulsating sounds...

    [youtube:3kaz6atb]sY0G-MIUEd8[/youtube:3kaz6atb]

    Hope this helps someone else with diagnosing their problem. My advice is to definitely try the bearing replacement, just use smooth even pressure to remove the bearing instead of hammer whacks... I'm sure there's a tool to do it, I just don't know what it would be. The picture below is how I set mine up to hammer it out...



    Again - I do recommend trying to replace the bearings (it was only $10 at an online bearing supplier), but I don't recommend hammering the shaft... good luck!

  11. #11
    Senior Member In the Industry

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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    I have a gear puller to use, but I don't change the bearings anymore. IMHO most of the time I find it too much of a hassle to get the motors that come in here apart.(been leaking forever and the bottom on the motor is completely rusted through!)

    So I only replace the motors now.

  12. #12
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    Re: How Hard is Motor Bearing Replacement?

    Yeah, a puller of some sort (bearing, pulley, steering wheel) is definitely the right approach. The motor end plate is sort of hard to get a puller to grab hold of, but I'm sure there is a way to make one work. Probably rig up a jig to bolt the steering wheel puller to the bolt holes on the housing if the arms of the bearing puller slip off. But you're right, that's a lot of work.

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