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Thread: sacrificial anode

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    Otis B.'s Avatar
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    sacrificial anode

    My pool is in the process of being refurbished and we are going with a SWG. Does anyone here have a sacrificial anode installed on their pool? After watch some of Swimming Pool Steves videos I'm thinking of asking my PB to install one.

    Swimming Pool Anodes - YouTube


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    Re: sacrificial anode

    The way i see it is that it cant hurt but it may only help in the long run on some parts of your pool. I look at it like my water heater in my camper as it has one but it is a fresh water system and it also has parts that could corrode. You pool with a SWG is mostly SS,PVC and maybe copper parts also. the only part that really corrodes are the plates in the cell of your SWG so it might extend the life of that but not by 40 or 50 years like pool steve says. I would get a price and if cheap enough then go with it as like a extra insurance. Good luck and I would like to see some other post on this. Thanks

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    cowboycasey's Avatar
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    Re: sacrificial anode

    I did my own connected to the bonding grid, if it helps 1% I think it will be worth it.. needs to be buried and be damp, i installed mine right under pump...

    cheapest one I found
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    Re: sacrificial anode

    I'm not sure Swimming Pool Steve is the best source for pool information. In another of his videos he mistakes a water bond for an anode. So he talks big but doesn't even know what one looks like.

    The bottom line is damage from galvanic crosion is not common. There just are not that many metal parts exposed in a pool.

    Note that Steve cannot show us a single picture of any damage.

    But if you are concerned add an anode. Cowboy above provides an example and directions.

    Every pool does not need one and salt water does not make them necessary.
    22k gallon IG pebblefina, Jandy 1.5 HP VS, Jandy CV Cartridge filter, Fafco solar panels, Polaris 360 supply side cleaner, waterfall

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    JoyfulNoise's Avatar
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    Re: sacrificial anode

    The question is - what are your trying to protect with a sacrificial anode? Just burying a zinc rod in the ground and attaching it to the bond wire will likely do nothing for your inground pool, or any pool for that matter. If you can be more clear about what you are trying to protect with it, better advice can be given.
    Matt
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    ITR's Avatar
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    Re: sacrificial anode

    Quote Originally Posted by JoyfulNoise View Post
    Just burying a zinc rod in the ground and attaching it to the bond wire will likely do nothing for your inground pool, or any pool for that matter.
    Thank you...I was trying to figure out the same thing but didn't want to look stupid.
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    Re: sacrificial anode

    I have a sacrificial anode in my system. It becomes crusty by the end of each season, so at startup I grind off the outside cake before reinstalling it. Whatever the cake is, I would rather have it on my anode than inside my equipment.
    " A little knowledge is a dangerous thing"
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    JoyfulNoise's Avatar
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    Re: sacrificial anode

    Quote Originally Posted by dradam View Post
    I have a sacrificial anode in my system. It becomes crusty by the end of each season, so at startup I grind off the outside cake before reinstalling it. Whatever the cake is, I would rather have it on my anode than inside my equipment.
    That is probably not a good sign. It is very likely your anode is becoming heavily polarized and the zinc (assuming it's zinc, you did not say) is simply oxidizing. Once that happens, the anode effectively stops working.

    All ground-based sacrificial anodes need to be bagged and filled with a conductive backfill composition that reduces anode polarization effects. Polarization of a sacrificial anode leads to voltage "hotspots" on the anode surface (uneven electric field distribution) which in turn leads to high current areas, typically around defects and crevices. The over-potential leads to formation of excess scale (typically oxides and hydroxides) which effectively "poisons" the anode surface and stops it form working.

    Normally, zinc and magnesium anodes are bagged in a porous cotton sack and filled with a mixture of gypsum (calcium sulfate), bentonite clay and sodium sulfate. The gypsum creates a uniform, conductive medium so that the anode can conduct sufficient amounts of current when placed in soil (soils are typically too high in resistance for the anode to be in direct contact with). The bentonite clay acts as a moisture absorbing material to keep the anode bag conductive and moist. The sodium sulfate ensures that the anode stays depolarized and forms sulfate salts with zinc or magnesium that are easily dissolved into the surrounding soil. As well, proper sacrificial anode design requires that the anode be in close proximity to the structure it is protecting to reduce path length resistance on the connecting wire. As well, the anode area must be matched properly to the cathode area (typically 1:1 or greater) so that the anode does not become heavily polarized.

    This is why I commented that attaching an anode to the bond wire probably does very little good. The anode will, in most circumstances, be too far away from the structure it is protecting and it will be undersized in area relative to the the area of the cathode (the object being protected). In most circumstances, when a large object like a pipeline or a tank is being catholically protected, one installs multiple sacrificial anodes at prescribed distances along the object to ensure proper protection.

    There's certainly nothing wrong with hanging an anode on your bonding line, I just wouldn't expect it to do much...
    Matt
    16k IG PebbleTec pool, 650gal spa, spillway and waterfall, 3HP IntelliFlo VS / 1.5HP WhisperFlo, Pentair QuadDE-100 filter, IC40 SWCG, MasterTemp 400k BTU/hr NG heater, KreepyKrauly suction-side cleaner Dolphin S300i robot, EasyTouch controls, city water, K-1001, K-2006 and K-1766 test kits, Mannitol test for borates

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