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Thread: Stenner Pumps - Why 220V?

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    Stenner Pumps - Why 220V?

    I'm in the midst of planning a Stenner pump install and a lot of the threads I'm seeing indicate that many people have used 220V models.

    In my equipment area, I've got a standard GFCI receptacle on it's own breaker that I was planning on wiring to the timer/switch and using a 120V stenner pump.

    But I'm wondering if I'm missing something. Electrical isn't my specialty. And I may be over-thinking this.

    So why do so many people use the 220V models? Is it because there's already 220 there for the pump motors? Even then, why not just tag off one of the legs to power a 120V Stenner?

    Thoughts please. I'm open to discussion.
    John - 16,000 gallon | in ground | pebble | Triton II sand filter | TF100 | speedstir | Hayward Phoenix 2x

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    Mod Squad tim5055's Avatar
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    Re: Stenner Pumps - Why 220V?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cinic View Post
    But I'm wondering if I'm missing something. Electrical isn't my specialty. And I may be over-thinking this.

    So why do so many people use the 220V models? Is it because there's already 220 there for the pump motors? Even then, why not just tag off one of the legs to power a 120V Stenner?

    Thoughts please. I'm open to discussion.
    A few thoughts-

    1. Yes, because 220 is already there. I actually tied mine to the pump timer so that it can't be on if the pump is off

    2. There may not necessarily be a neutral available to create 110v form one 220v leg.

    3. Under current codes your pump is required to be on a GFCI circuit. "Tagging off" one leg will create an imbalance that will trip the GFCI

    I don''t know you, but you admit "Electrical isn't my specialty". Know your limitations for safety.

    If you haven't seen it, here is my Stenner Pump install with photos.
    TFP Moderator 39 X 18 23,000(ish) freeform gunite; built 2007ish; Pentair Triton II TR100 600lb Sand filter; 2 HP Pentair pump with 2.2 HP AO Smith single speed motor; 2 skimmers, 1 main drain, 4 returns w/waterfall, Stenner 45MHP2 3GPD running@ 60% - 15 gal Tank; heated by the sun CYA 200+ when I started - 50 now. Dolphin Supreme M5 Pool Cleaner. Hot Springs SX Spa, 285 gallon

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    Re: Stenner Pumps - Why 220V?

    Thanks for the input.

    I am usually a DIY guy, but as I noted and as you highlighted, I understand my limitations. That being said, I still really want to know the whys and hows and design a proper system with my available options. Even if I don't do the work myself.

    I had seen your setup in the past. Just so I understand, is your Stenner always running when your pool pump is running? And you have a variable output pump that is adjusted for seasonal demand?

    I imagined having the pump on a separate timer and adjusting the time. Someone else also had an idea I liked which was a current switch. So the pump would only run if the motor was drawing current and wouldn't inject if there was a motor failure.

    Thanks again for your input.
    John - 16,000 gallon | in ground | pebble | Triton II sand filter | TF100 | speedstir | Hayward Phoenix 2x

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    Mod Squad tim5055's Avatar
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    Re: Stenner Pumps - Why 220V?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cinic View Post
    I had seen your setup in the past. Just so I understand, is your Stenner always running when your pool pump is running? And you have a variable output pump that is adjusted for seasonal demand?
    That is correct.
    TFP Moderator 39 X 18 23,000(ish) freeform gunite; built 2007ish; Pentair Triton II TR100 600lb Sand filter; 2 HP Pentair pump with 2.2 HP AO Smith single speed motor; 2 skimmers, 1 main drain, 4 returns w/waterfall, Stenner 45MHP2 3GPD running@ 60% - 15 gal Tank; heated by the sun CYA 200+ when I started - 50 now. Dolphin Supreme M5 Pool Cleaner. Hot Springs SX Spa, 285 gallon

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    Re: Stenner Pumps - Why 220V?

    I use a fixed rate 220 V Stenner because i have Easy Touch automation. I use a relay in the Easy Touch to control the Stenner pump down to the minute via a schedule, and tie the input of that relay into the 220 V output of my pump relay. This insures the Stenner cannot ever be on unless the pump relay is on.
    38000 Gal, IG, Plaster, 20' x 40' x 10', Attached Raised Spa, Intelliflo VS 3 HP (011018), Pentair Quad DE 60 Filter, Raypak (Rheem) 400,000 BTU (407a low Nox), Easy Touch 8 upgrade, Screenlogic 2 with wireless, IS-4 Spa Side Remote, Stenner 45MPHP10 w/15 gal tank, Intellibrite 5g (3), Dolphin Triton Plus robot with PRO remote, Water Tech Catfish handheld vacuum for spa, TF100 with SpeedStir.

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    Re: Stenner Pumps - Why 220V?

    I used a 110 because for me it was just easier. I don't think there is an advantage either way.
    21,000 gallon pool w/spa, Pebble Sheen, Hayward EcoStar variable speed filter pump, Hayward DE6020 Filter, Hayward 400FDN Heater, Stenner pump with 15 gallon tank, Clear O3 ozone system, Hayward Goldline PS-8 controller, Hayward 6060 cleaner pump, Polaris 280 cleaner, Hayward EcoStar variable speed water feature pump.

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    Re: Stenner Pumps - Why 220V?

    From my research:

    - 220V can be better if your main pump is controlled by a 220V timer or relay, because you can connect it to the same output and ensure the Stenner never runs without the pump. It does require either an adjustable rate Stenner (more costly) or an additional 220V timer (e.g. Intermatic P1353ME) or automation panel to control the dosage.

    - 110V can be better if you can't slave it off of the main pump anyway (e.g. with a VS IntelliFlo pump with built-in controller, like I have now), and if you have 120V available nearby. It has a standard plug, so a $20 landscape timer (e.g. Woods 50015) be used to control the dosage. There's no direct protection against the Stenner running without the main pump (a current sensing relay might work), but if both the main pump and Stenner timers are digital and battery backed, and you are careful about setting them, that mitigates the risk somewhat.

    - If connection to an automation panel (e.g. an EasyTouch) with both 110V and 220V available on its own relay, either can work. If I go this route, I'm thinking 110V because it allows more flexibility; I'll have an outlet connected to the output of the relay, and just plug the Stenner into that. The EasyTouch will ensure it doesn't activate without the main pump.
    21000gal IG plaster, Sacramento CA area (late 1950s/early 60s)
    Filter: Cartridge, Pentair CCP420 (2014)
    Main pump: Pentair IntelliFlo VS (2015)
    Boost pump: 3/4hp (2011), Polaris 280 cleaner (unknown age)

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