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Thread: Hardibacker and "edging"

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    Hardibacker and "edging"

    I just completed framing and am about to move onto covering my island with HardiBacker. I plan on using stone veneer on the sides, and a solid stone countertop.

    In looking at many of the photos on-line, I see that a lot of people use an edging, kind of like drywall edging around all of the HardiBacker. Is this necessary if I'm going to cover with stone? I could see this if doing a stucco surface, but not sure if it's necessary for stone surfaces.

    _mike

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    Join Date
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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    I used a stone veneer (Corning Cultured Stone) on mine. I didn't use the edging, but I did use the metal lathe with a scratch coat of mortar before applying the stone. I know there is debate on whether that is necessary or not. The few gaps I had at the edges were filled with the scratch coat and then covered with the stone corner pieces.

    I haven't quite finished my island so I haven't posted much in the way of pics.

    What kind of stone countertop are you using. I ended up going with soapstone and I'm really pleased with it.

    Geoff

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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    I've been looking at Pennsylvania Blue stone, but I also like soapstone. Haven;t decided yet. Will probably come down to price.

    No picts of mine yet either. Hoping to get a little further along.

    _mike

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    frustratedpoolmom's Avatar
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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    Hmmmm.....

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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    Worthless maybe a bit strong You have however intimidated me enough to go and take some picts of current progress. Will post soon.

    _mike

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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    OK, some images. This is my first grill island, it's also my first time working with steel studs. As usual, would probably do things differently if I had to do over, but it's not too bad. Our space is a bit tight, so it's not terribly large. Double doors along front beneath the grill. Propane access on right side.

    Planning on cultured stone surface, and a solid counter. probably something like Pennsylvania Blue stone.
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    DrDave's Avatar
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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    Make sure your propane compartment is partitioned from your BBQ unit and put vents both high and low in all compartments. Cover the bottom with HB and use Trex for feet.
    DrDave
    http://plansbyjorde.tripod.com
    Necessity is the Mother of Invention

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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    Check, check and check.

    Question about the legs. I'm contemplating using industrial castors on the bottom. I don't have an absolute requirement to be mobile, but I think it may be useful. The ones I'm looking at are good for close to 175-200 lbs. each. If I use 6 of them, I can handle around 1200 pounds.

    Thoughts?

    _mike

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    DrDave's Avatar
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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    Well, your island is small enough to get away with it. If you feel the need to move it frequently then do it, but first build an angle iron rectangular frame around the bottom with 1/4 steel plates in each corner for your castors to mount to. If you don't, and you hit a pebble or anything else while in motion, the thin frame material will buckle.
    I think that if you cover the bottom with 1/2" and use 5" X 5" Trex, screwed and glued to each corner and stress point, that you will be able to successfully move it with little difficulty. Granted, it is not as portable but it is solid and doable.
    So now you have to decide how often do you really want to move it and how far. That should make your decision easy.[attachment=0:21cmbgxf]Corner foot installed.jpg[/attachment:21cmbgxf]
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    DrDave
    http://plansbyjorde.tripod.com
    Necessity is the Mother of Invention

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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    Hmm, excellent info. I don;t have a need for portability, I just thought it would be "nice to have", but I think with Trex would provide enough lift to "get under neath it", and be able to coax it along if/when I needed to move. I was very worried about breaking a castor and then I'd be screwed

    Thanks for the info. Will probably do Trex, as it seem the best option.

    _mike

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    DrDave's Avatar
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    Re: Hardibacker and "edging"

    Quote Originally Posted by nibeck
    Hmm, excellent info. I don;t have a need for portability, I just thought it would be "nice to have", but I think with Trex would provide enough lift to "get under neath it", and be able to coax it along if/when I needed to move. I was very worried about breaking a castor and then I'd be screwed

    Thanks for the info. Will probably do Trex, as it seem the best option.

    _mike
    You have learned well, butterfly!
    DrDave
    http://plansbyjorde.tripod.com
    Necessity is the Mother of Invention

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